RIDE THE FUTURE TOUR
3000 Miles, Zero Gas



The 44 Cities

March 4, 2013

44 Ways to Celebrate

Reddit/adgold typographic US map

We’re throwing 44 parties along our route across America! Each of these stopovers has it’s own history, culture, and awesome residents and we can’t wait to celebrate in each one!

 

Over the next few days keep a lookout for your fave city or landmark as we profile each of our stops in “The 43″!

 

 

SPECIAL THANKS TO BEN HOPKINS FOR BRINGING US

THE INTERESTING SCOOP ON EACH OF OUR CTIES ALONG THE WAY!!

 

ben cafe 1

 

RIDE THE FUTURE TOUR

JULY 4 – DAY ONE

CHARLESTON: SOUTH CAROLINA

We couldn’t have chosen a better kick off point for Ride The Future Tour. Drenched in southern charm, Charleston is the oldest and second-largest city in the South Eastern state of South Carolina

Known for its rich history, well-preserved architecture, restaurant community, and friendly vibe, Charleston has been named the ‘Best Mannered City in America’ for 11 years in a row.

In 1861, the first shots of the civil war rang out at Fort Summer, in Charleston’s Harbour. On July 4th, 2013, the starting gun for Ride The Future Tour will ring in the age of electric vehicles.

DISTANCE TO COLUMBIA: 115 MILES

JULY 4 – DAY ONE

COLUMBIA: SOUTH CAROLINA

South Carolina’s state capital welcomes the electric tour with wide, shady streets and the kind of old fashioned downtown where pillbox hats are still on display in the windows of family run department stores. That’s all fine and dandy but it’s to the city’s youth that we’ll be looking to whoop it up and add some energy to our evening’s entertainment.

Interesting snippet: The name “Columbia” was a poetic term for the Americas derived from Christopher Columbus.

DISTANCE TO GREENVILLE: 136 MILES

JULY 5 – DAY TWO

GREENVILLE: SOUTH CAROLINA

There’s money to be made in them there mountains. Gold, rubies and emeralds have been mined in this city of 60,000 since the early 18th century. Nestled in the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains Greenville is better known today for its Reed River open-air concerts that draw musicians and concertgoers from around the country throughout the summer months.

DISTANCE TO ATHENS 80 MILES

JULY 6 – DAY THREE

ATHENS – GEORGIA

Exiting South Carolina we enter Georgia, otherwise known as Peach State. A quirky law of Peach State stipulates that donkeys may not be kept in bathtubs.

Wise to the law of the land, we’ll enter the beery, artsy and laid-back college town of Athens ready to party. Famous world wide for a music scene that has spawned great bands such as REM and B-52s Athens also boasts a vibrant cycling scene. Throughout the year Critical Mass events are held on the last Friday of each month along with city centre cycle races that draw in the big crowds.

Pedal power, live music and a thriving bar scene: Sounds like our dream city.

DISTANCE TO ATLANTA: 68 MILES

JULY 7 – DAY FOUR

ATLANTA – GEORGIA

Born as a railroad junction in 1837 Atlanta is famed as the home of civil rights movement titan Martin Luther King. Today, racial tensions are minimal in this city ‘too busy to hate’. With a population of five million Atlanta boasts a constellation of superlative restaurants, ample Civil War lore, miles of walking trails and a plethora of African American history.

For the 1996 Summer Olympic Games the city put on her prettiest debutante gown and CNN beamed her picture to the world. We’ll be doing our darnedest to compete with those heady days as we role our electric vehicles into town.

DISTANCE TO CALHOUN: 68 MILES

JULY 8 – DAY FIVE

CALHOUN – GEORGIA

One of the pleasures of traveling this great landmass in the slow lane will be the opportunity to visit small towns with rich histories. Calhoun, with a population of little over 15,000 was once a stronghold of the native-American Cherokee people and a site of conflict during the Civil War. In 1831 Calhoun forced the Cherokee off their land and in 1861 seceded from the Union as a prelude to the Civil War.

DISTANCE TO CHATTANOOGA: 52 MILES

JULY 9 – DAY SIX

CHATTANOOGA – GEORGIA

In Cherokee language Chattanooga means, “to draw fish out of water.” The name was originally given to a collection of huts occupied by Indian fishermen. In those days Chattanooga could have vied for the greenest place on earth. Those were the good old days.

In the 1960s Chattanooga was named “the dirtiest city in America” and was shamed into cleaning up its rampant industrial pollution. Today the city is recognized as being one of the country’s greenest, with miles of well used waterfront trails, free electric buses and pedestrian bridges crossing the Tennessee River.

Well done y’all

DISTANCE TO MCMINNVILLE: 65 MILES

JULY 10 – DAY NINE

MCMINNVILLE – TENNESSEE

Located at the foot of the Cumberland Plateau at an elevation of almost 1,000 feet McMinnville is affectionately known as the “Nursery Capital of the World.” It’s a well-earned accolade considering this small town, with a population of just over 15,000, boasts around 450 plant nurseries generating over $300 million in revenue a year.

If accommodation is sparse we might end up bedding down with the tomatoes… in a greenhouse.

DISTANCE TO NASHVILLE: 72 MILES

JULY 11 – DAY EIGHT

NASHVILLE – TENNESSEE

We’re banking on the soul stirring joy of country music to replace the monotonous hum of our electric motors as we roll into downtown Nashville. Since the early 20th century this city has been attracting musicians who have taken the country ‘genre’ from hillbilly music of the 1920s to the slick Nashville sound of the 1960s to the punk tinged alt country of the 1990s. Let’s hope our nightly singer/songwriter contest draws inspiration from Nashville’s plethora of country legends.

Country music isn’t the only thing that gets spiced up in Nashville; chocolate wasabi popsicles are a local specialty along with ‘hot as hell’ spicy fried chicken. Bring it on Nashville

DISTANCE TO PARSONS: 95 MILES

JULY 12 – DAY NINE

NATCHEZ TRACE STATE PARK  – TENNESSEE

With the many acres of scenic woodlands, the park includes four lakes, a swimming beach, a 47 room resort inn and restaurant complex, cabins, group lodge, camping areas, picnicking sites, playgrounds, a ball field, a regulation pistol firing range, picturesque hiking trails, a wrangler camp, 250 miles of horse riding trails, a park store, and archery range. Natchez Trace State Park is named for the famous “Natchez to Nashville” highway, an important wilderness road during the early 18th century. A western spur of The Trace ran through a portion of what is now the park. The park was built as part of President Roosevelt’s “New Deal” program. The land was bought from residents who could no longer make a living farming the land because of extensive erosion problems.

DISTANCE TO WHITEVILLE: 64 MILES

JULY 13 – DAY TEN

WHITEVILLE – TENNESSEE

The small town of Whiteville was founded in the early 1800s as a trading post and incorporated in 1801. Located between Jackson and Memphis Tennessee the town attracts a growing number of folk escaping the big city life and traveling across America on electric bikes.

 

DISTANCE TO MEMPHIS: 62 MILES

 

JULY 14 – DAY ELEVEN

 

MEMPHIS – TENNESSEE

 

Located on the Mississippi and seeped in the legends of jazz and blues Memphis doesn’t just attract tourists, it draws pilgrims. Music lovers come to lose themselves amid the throb of blues guitar on Beale Street.

 

Named after the ancient capital of Egypt, Memphis’ troubled history oozes the blues. A post Civil War collapse of the port city’s cotton trade followed by a yellow fever outbreak caused most whites to flee the city forcing Memphis to declare bankruptcy. The African American community revived the city and by the early 1900s Beale Street was the hub of black social and civic activity, becoming an early centre for what was to be known as blues music. In the ‘50s and ‘60s, local recording companies cut tracks for blues, soul, R&B, and rockabilly artists such as Al Green, Johnny Cash and Elvis, cementing Memphis’ place in American music lore.

 

 

DISTANCE TO BRINKLEY: 71 MILES

 

JULY 15 – DAY TWELVE

BRINKLEY – ARKANSAS

 

We imagine the mercury will be rising and the landscape melting as we steer our electric vehicles across the state the border into Arkansas. From its ties to the transportation industry, the City of Brinkley continues to maintain a position at the center of major transportation arteries. Brinkley is located in Monroe County in the rich relics from the past and rolling farmlands of the Arkansas Delta. The halfway point between Little Rock and Memphis, it is a convenient oasis for travelers

 

DISTANCE TO LITTLE ROCK: 68 MILES

 

JULY 16 – DAY THIRTEEN

 

LITTLE ROCK  – ARKANSAS

As the state capital of Arkansas Little Rock derives its name from just that, a little rock on the south bank of the Arkansas River. The rock made convenient crossing for early travelers and the name stuck.

 

DISTANCE TO ODEN: 101 MILES

 

 

 

JULY 17 – DAY FOURTEEN

ODEN – ARKANSAS

As of the census of 2000, there were 220 people, 79 households, and 65 families residing in Oden. We’re hoping to meet every one of them.

 

DISTANCE TO FT SMITH : 85 MILES

 

 

JULY 18  - DAY FIFTEEN

 

 

FT SMITH – ARKANSAS

 

The site of Fort Smith became part of the United States in the Louisiana Purchase (1803). Soon after, the Pike Expedition (1806) explored the Arkansas River. Fort Smith was founded in 1817 as a military post. Around the fort a small settlement began forming, but the Army abandoned the first Fort Smith in 1824 and moved 80 miles further west to Fort Gibson. Army sutler and land speculator John Rogers (who some genealogists claim to be an ancestor to 20th-century Oklahoma comedian Will Rogers) bought up former government-owned lands and promoted growth of the new civilian town of Fort Smith, eventually influencing the federal government to re-establish a strong military presence at Fort Smith during the era of Indian Removal and the Mexican War.

Fort Smith’s name comes from General Thomas Adams Smith (1781–1844), who commanded the United States Army Rifle Regiment in 1817, headquartered near St. Louis. General Smith had ordered Army topographical engineer Stephen H. Long (1784–1864) to find a suitable site on the Arkansas River for a fort. General Smith never visited the town or forts that bore his name.

 

DISTANCE TO HENRYETTA: 102 MILES

JULY 19 – DAY SIXTEEN

HENRYETTA – OKLAHOMA

 

Rolling ever deeper into the heart of America we pull up at Henryetta, named after one Hugh Henry, whose own story echoes the storyline of the Oscar winning film, ‘There will be Blood’. In 1885 Hugh Henry established a ranch on Creek Nation land and found a deposit of coal to fuel the forge at his ranch. More coal deposits were found attracting railroads, industry and a comfortable retirement for one Hugh Henry.

 

DISTANCE TO OKLAHOMA CITY: 92 MILES

 

JULY 20 – DAY 17

 

OKLAHOMA CITY – OKLAHOMA

 

Oklahoma City marks the point where ‘Ride the Future Tour’ meets ‘Route 66’, bringing to mind the ultimate road song, Bobby Troupe’s 1946 classic, Route 66.

 

Now you go through Saint Louis,

Joplin, Missouri,

Oklahoma City is mighty pretty”

 

Oklahoma has worked hard over the years to become more than just a cow town, without turning its back on its cowboy heritage, best captured in the exemplary ‘National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum’. We’re looking forward to meeting the locals as we set up our stalls and extend the hand of friendship.

 

DISTANCE TO CLINTON: 86 MILES

 

JULY 21 – DAY 18

 

CLINTON – OKLAHOMA

 

Staying on Route 66 we roll into Clinton, a town whose roots can be traced back to 1899, when two men, J.L. Avant and E.E. Blake, decided to locate a town in the Washita River Valley.

To cut a long story short, the men purchased 320 acres from four different Indians – Hays, Shoe-Boy, Nowahy, and Night Killer, paying them each $2,000 for 80 acres to begin the small settlement of Washita Junction.

Congressional approval for the sale was granted in 1902 and Washita Junction quickly developed. The first businesses were the office of the Custer County Chronicle newspaper and the First National Bank building. When a post office was started, the postal department would not accept the name of Washita Junction; so the town was named for the late Judge Clinton Irwin.

 

JULY 22 – DAY 19

 

 

 

SHAMROCK – TEXAS

 

 

 

As the green leaf shamrock is the symbol of Ireland it’ll come as no surprise that this small city was given its name by an Irish immigrant. George Nickel it was who sauntered into town with the dream of opening a post office in 1890. When a post office named Shamrock took root the seed was planted and the future was green. Today the city’s website boasts the best St Patrick’s Day celebrations in Texas, not bad for a city with a population of just over 2,000.

 

 

 

JULY 23 – DAY 20

 

 

 

AMARILLO – TEXAS

 

 

 

In the land of ranches that stretch to the horizon Amarillo has its share of cattle, processing and packing a quarter of the entire nation’s meat supply. Located near the middle of the Texas Panhandle, Amarillo is part of the Staked Plains region, an stunning area of plunging canyons second only to The Grand Canyon.

 

 

 

Amarillo’s harsh landscape and extreme weather were featured in John Steinbeck’s Grapes of Wrath during the dustbowl crisis and made legendary in Bob Dylan’s soaring masterpiece “Brownsville Girl” where he refers to Amarillo as “the land of the living dead”. But we know he was only kidding, right!

 

 

 

JULY 24 – DAY 21

 

 

 

TUCUMCARI – NEW MEXICO

 

 

 

Tucumcari began life at the turn of the 20th century as a construction camp named ‘Six Shooter Sliding’ due to its numerous gunfights. Today it’s a friendly city of just over 5,000, made famous as the setting for the television show, Rawhide (1959 – 1966), starring Clint Eastwood.

 

 

 

 

 

JULY 25 – DAY 22

 

 

 

LAS VEGAS – NEW MEXICO

 

 

 

Not to be confused with the glittery city to the west in Nevada, this Vegas is one of the loveliest towns in New Mexico and one of the largest and oldest towns east of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. Historic charm oozing mild mannered and friendly locals characterize this Las Vegas… but it wasn’t always so!

 

 

 

The arrival of the railroad on July 4, 1879 brought with it businesses and people, both respectable and dubious. Murderers, robbers, thieves, gamblers, gunmen, swindlers, vagrants, and tramps poured in, transforming the eastern side of the settlement into a virtually lawless brawl. Among the notorious characters were such legends of the Old West as: dentist Doc Holliday and his girlfriend Big Nose Kate, Jesse James, Billy the Kid, Wyatt Earp, Mysterious Dave Mather, Hoodoo Brown, and Handsome Harry the Dancehall Rustler.

 

Historian Ralph Emerson Twitchell once claimed regarding the Old West, “Without exception there was no town which harbored a more disreputable gang of desperadoes and outlaws than did Las Vegas.”

 

 

 

JULY 26 – DAY 23

 

 

 

SANTE FE – NEW MEXICO

 

 

 

The tarmac will be melting and the slopes inclining as the electric caravan enters Santé Fe, at 7,000 feet, the highest state capital in the US. Founded around 1610, Sante Fe is the second oldest city in the USA. Time has been kind to Santé Fe as it’s now synonymous with contemporary chic and houses the second largest art market in the nation, gourmet restaurants, great museums, spas and a world class opera house.

 

 

 

JULY 27 – DAY 24

 

 

 

ALBUQUERQUE – NEW MEXICO

 

 

 

Founded in 1706 as a Spanish colonial outpost, New Mexico’s most populous city is named after its Spanish namesake, which also happens to be the capital of Spain’s corking industry.

 

 

 

We’re told the city has a unique charm with locals more than happy to share history, highlights and must try restaurants. With an eclectic mix of university students, Native Americans and Hispanics we’re reckoning on an electric encounter with the good folk of Albuquerque.

 

 

 

JULY 28 – DAY 25

 

 

 

GRANTS – NEW MEXICO

 

 

 

In the 1880’s a trio of Grant bros from Canada set up a railroad camp and named it, yep… Grants Camp. For decades the camp thrived as a railroad-logging town. When that went into decline it gained status as the carrot capital of America before entering a boom period as a center for uranium mining. The collapse of mining pulled the town into depression but Grants has enjoyed a resurgence following a boom in tourism thanks to its natural beauty.

 

 

 

Recent interest in nuclear energy has revived the possibility of more uranium mining in the area… fingers crossed, after we’ve gone!

 

 

 

JULY 29 – DAY 26

 

 

 

SANDERS – ARIZONA

 

 

 

Like much of modern America the small town of Sanders was born on a rail track and named after its founder, in this case Art Sanders, a railroad office engineer who had a trading post nearby. Located in Apache County, famed for the legendary Native American, Chief Geronimo.

 

 

JULY 30 – DAY 27

 

 

WINSLOW – ARIZONA

 

 

Rock ‘n’ roll’s as integral to modern America’s cultural identity as burgers and space exploration. The Eagles brought Winslow to duke boxes around the world with their twangy 1970s tune “Take it Easy” and the line, “Standing on the corner in Winslow Arizona, such a fine sight to see…”

 

 

JULY 31 – DAY 28

 

 

FLAGSTAFF – ARIZONA

 

 

Located at an elevation of 7,000 feet and surrounded by mountains reaching over 12,000 feet, Flagstaff has become a magnet for outdoor types with great camping, trekking, mountain biking and road cycle races as well as cross country skiing events.

 

Only 75 miles south of the Grand Canyon National Park the town also serves as a base for Grand Canyon and Colorado River expeditions.

 

The city is named after a Ponderosa Pine flagpole made by a scouting party from Boston to celebrate the United States centennial on July 4th, 1776.

 

 

 

AUGUST 1 – DAY 29

 

 

 

GRAND CANYON

 

 

 

Even the amazing Ride the Future Tour will be humbled by the breathtaking grandeur of the Grand Canyon. Arguably the USA’s best-known natural attraction, it’s impossible to over eulogize this great wonder of Mother Nature.

 

 

 

At 277 miles long, up to 18 miles wide and plunging a depth of over a mile, or 6,000 feet, the Grand Canyon leaves the greatest poets and novelists of our time scrambling for superlatives. It’s as if some mighty hand has sliced the earth’s surface with a knife, allowing us a glimpse into two billion years of geological history.

 

 

 

For many, the affect is a spiritual awakening.

 

 

 

 

 

JULY 31 – DAY 30

 

 

 

SELIGMAN – ARIZONA

 

 

 

Slaughterhouse owners from the family clans Thuet and Moultrie established Seligman in 1881–91 after losing everything in the Civil War. Situated on Route 66 traffic and commerce pretty much came to a standstill the day they opened Interstate 40 without signposting Seligman.

 

 

 

 

 

AUGUST 1 – DAY 31

 

 

 

KINGMAN – ARIZONA

 

 

 

Route 66 enthusiasts will love the faded motels and gas stations galore that feature in and around Kingman’s main drag. Founded in 1882 Kingman was named after the railroad surveyor Lewis Kingman and was known for its modest beginnings as a simple railroad siding.

 

 

 

In more recent times Kingman captured media attention when Pamela Anderson was forced to issue a written apology to the police for a Playboy photo shoot on 4th Street and Andy Devine Avenue… We reckon because they missed it.

 

 

 

AUGUST 2 – DAY 32

 

 

 

LAS VEGAS – NEVADA

 

 

 

Over a hundred years before glittering balls started multiplying skyward Las Vegas was little more than a watering hole in the desert on the Old Spanish Trail leading north and north-west from Texas.

 

 

 

The legalization of gambling in 1931 along with the construction of the nearby Hoover Dam and the influx of scientists from the Manhattan Project, an atomic research project of WWII, led to major development in the1940s.

 

 

 

Today, Las Vegas is one of the most lavish places on earth where nothing is halfway, especially the illusions. Neon lit hieroglyphics, a fake Eiffel Tower, Brooklyn Bridge and the canals of Venice can all be cruised between spinning the wheel in cathedral casinos, blinking in glittering shows and shoveling down never ending buffets and ever flowing drinks.

 

 

 

The lights never go out in Las Vegas, meaning there should be plenty of power-points to recharge our electric vehicles.

 

 

 

 

 

AUGUST 5 – DAY 33

 

 

 

BAKER – CALIFORNIA

 

 

 

Entering California at the southern end of the Death Valley geological depression we expect the temperatures to be swelteringly hot. Founded in 1908 and named after Richard C. Baker, President of the T&T Railroad, the small town of Baker stages the world’s tallest thermometer. Standing at 134 feet, its height commemorates the hottest temperature ever recorded in United States history, 134 Fahrenheit, measured at nearby Death Valley in 1913.

 

 

 

AUGUST 6 – DAY 34

 

 

 

BARSTOW – CALIFORNIA

 

Barstow is named after William Barstow Strong, former president of the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway. Some early Barstow names were Camp Sugarloaf, Grapevine, and Waterman Junction. Barstow experiences four seasons. Summer days are very hot, with highs typically exceeding 100 °F. Barstow has a series of murals along Main Street, depicting scenes from the city’s history. These murals were created byMain Street Murals, a local non-profit organization. Barstow has a number of museums: Mojave River Valley Museum, Route 66 Mother Road Museum, the Western America Rail Museum, and the Desert Discovery Center. Once a year a family opens their Black History collection to the public and nearby Fort Irwin is home to the 11 Cavalry and ACR Museum. The Old Woman meteorite, the largest meteorite found in California and the second largest in the United States, is housed in the Desert Discovery Center. Rainbow Basin is an Area of Critical Environmental Concern due to landscape features and paleontological resources in the area.Located 8 miles (13 km) north of Barstow, its diverse landscape, multi-colored rock formations and scenic canyons are popular with photographers, hikers and campers keen to experience the area’s natural beauty. The fossiliferous Barstow Formation (Miocene) is well exposed there. Rainbow Basin is managed by the Bureau of Land Management‘s Barstow Field Office.

 

 

 

 

 

AUGUST 7 – DAY 35

 

 

 

BIG BEAR LAKE

 

 

 

Once populated by Native Americans and grizzly bears from which the town draws its name, Big Bear Lake is the first mountain recreation area of South California with skiing in the winter and mountain biking and fishing in the summer.

 

 

 

Mountainous and magnificent, Big Bear Lake was the filming location for the 1969 Clint Eastwood musical ‘Paint Your Wagon’ and the 1920 version of ‘Last of the Mohicans’. The grizzly bear disappeared long ago but the black bear can still be spotted, sometimes in residential areas… gulp!

 

 

 

AUGUST 8 – DAY 36

 

 

 

CORONA – CALIFORNIA

 

 

 

By now we can almost smell the Pacific Ocean and fruit fields of California.

 

 

 

Owing its existence to the 1886 citrus boom Corona was once known as the lemon capital of the world. A museum presents the lemon’s former role in the economy. Today, Carolina is a city with a population of over 150,000 and since the 1990s has been considered a major suburb of Los Angeles.

 

 

 

AUGUST 9 – DAY 37

 

 

 

NEWPORT BEACH– CALIFORNIA

 

 

 

With the Beach Boys ringing in our ears we’ll be “pickin’ up good vibrations” as we hit the Pacific coast and enter the final seven days of our tour.

 

 

The Upper Bay of Newport is a canyon, which was carved by steam in the Pleistocene period. The lower bay of Newport was formed much later by sand, brought along by ocean currents, constructed the offshore beach, now recognized as the Balboa Peninsula of Newport Beach. Before settlers reached the coasts of California, the Newport area and surrounding areas were very prominent Indian lands. Indian shells and relics can still be found today scattered throughout the area. Though, throughout the 1800s, settlers began to settle the area due to the availability of land. The State of California sold acre-plots of land for $1 a piece in the Newport area. Anglo-American civilization in Newport grew substantially when in 1870 a 105-ton steamer named The Vaquero, captained by Captain Samuel S Dunnells, against warnings posted by surveyors, safely steered through the lower and upper bay of Newport where it unloaded its cargo. James Irvine, after hearing the astonishing news, quickly traveled from his home in San Francisco to the San Joaquin Ranch. Meeting in Irvine’s ranch house near current day UC Irvine with his brother, Robert Irvine, and friend James McFadden, they all agreed that the newly found port should be named simply, “Newport” thus where Newport Beach gets its name

 

 

 

AUGUST 10 – DAY 38

 

 

 

SANTA MONICA –CALIFORNIA

 

 

 

Mixing urban cool with laid-back vibe Santa Monica is the belle by the beach and home to many Hollywood stars and executives, students, surfers and professionals. Our eyes will be on the street performers who make car free, chain store lined Third Street Promenade the most action packed zone in the city.

 

 

 

AUGUST 11 – DAY 39

 

 

 

SANTA BARBARA – CALIFORNIA

 

Following the surreally scenic Central Coast we role into the coastal Shangri-La of Santa Barbara. Spanish-esque white washed buildings peering over pearly beaches and crashing waves Santa Barbara sure as hell got a dream slice of the American pie. The local wines are exceptional and the air is scented with citrus and jasmine… or so we’re told.

 

 

 

 

AUGUST 12 – DAY 40

 

 

SAN LUIS OBISPO – CALIFORNIA

 

 

 

Like so many California towns San Luis Obispo grew up around a Spanish Catholic mission founded in 1772 by Padre Junipero Serra.

 

 

 

Located amidst undulating hills that are notable as volcanic plugs and a grape’s throw from the popular Edna Valley wineries this town comes alive every Thursday night with the weekly farmers market. Students and locals spill out onto the streets before gathering for a mass, fun filled cycle tour of the city streets.

 

 

 

Jack Kerouac, iconic author of the beatnik classic On The Road was once a resident of this laid back, university town.

 

 

AUGUST 13 – DAY 41

 

 

 

 

BIG SUR – CALIFORNIA

 

 

Three tribes of Native Americans—the OhloneEsselen, and Salinan—were the first people to inhabit the area now known as Big Sur. Archaeological evidence shows that they lived in Big Sur for thousands of years, leading a nomadic, hunter-gatherer existence.

Few traces of their material culture have survived. Their arrow heads were made of obsidian and flint, which indicates trading links with tribes hundreds of miles away, since the nearest sources of these rocks are in the Sierra Nevada mountains and the northern California Coast Ranges.

They followed local food sources seasonally, living near the coast in winter to harvest rich stocks of musselsabaloneand other sea life, and moving inland at other times to harvest oak acorns. The native people hollowed mortar holes into large exposed rocks or boulders which they used to grind the acorns into flour. These can be found throughout the Big Sur region. The tribes also used controlled burning techniques to increase tree growth and food production

 

 

 

AUGUST 14 – DAY 41

 

 

 

SUNSET STATE BEACH  – CALIFORNIA

 

 

The beach features pine trees, mountainous sand dunes, and ocean side picnic spots. Bordered by large agricultural fields west of the city of Watsonville, the beach is a year-round destination for thousands of visitors.

 

 

 

AUGUST 15 – DAY 42

 

 

 

SAN GREGORIO – CALIFORNIA

 

 

 

In the 1850s San Gregorio was a magnet for wealthy San Franciscans who’d travel by stagecoach to enjoy fishing, hunting, sea bathing and boat races. Today, this unincorporated community of around 300 becomes the penultimate stage our tour.

 

 

 

AUGUST 16 – DAY 43

 

 

 

GOOGLE HQ – MOUNTAIN VIEW – CALIFORNIA

 

 

 

With three thousand miles of magnificent America under our wheels we conclude the tour at Google HQ in Mountain View, Silicon Valley, passing on the baton for the future of electric vehicles.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Special thanks to Reddit + adgold for what might be the coolest map ever.

 

 



About the Author

Susan Jones
Susan Jones





 
 

 
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Ride The Future Team Team members Duane, BenSwing, Ben, Susan, and Jonathan discuss our upcoming cross country tour with callers. Give it a listen!   <iframe width=”400″ height=”370″ src=”h...
by Susan Jones
 

 
 
leaf inspection

It’s a Big Day for this 2013 Nissan Leaf!

First Inspection Then the Wrap   Stay tuned for the next photo of the Leaf in its new skin
by Susan Jones
 

 
 
ecoseed image

Check Out Our Article in EcoSeed

        If you don’t already know this publication, you should subscribe. It’s a great source of news, tech innovations, and investment opportunities.   The sound of silence is rolling into ...
by Susan Jones
 

 




One Comment


  1. Driver_EV

    This is pretty exciting! I can hardly wait!



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